Imagine for a moment, a yacht. The on-page elements represent the sails and the ropes above water. Now imagine the technical elements of SEO are everything below the water line: the hull and the cabin. So you could have your sails blowing, and your knots tied correctly, but if there’s a hole in the bottom of your boat you’re not going to get very far. The biggest factor in the SEO revolution is the rise of content. Instead of stung blog posts with the right formatting and wording to make it to the top of search results, users are looking for quality content (not basic or timely information) more than ever. So is Google. On the internet, you can find hundreds of blogs, which are coming from self-proclaimed online marketers. What I find lacking in those blogs is they don’t take in stride the transition of content from the first-among-the-equal to being synonymous with SEO. If you have large sections of duplicate text page-to-page – that is a problem that should be targeted and removed.

Manually go through all linking websites

Don’t worry if you don’t have any formal training or education in your chosen area, Google will take into account the “amount of life experience” that makes them an expert on the topic and will value this as “everyday expertise.” Most marketers focusing on SEO break down SEO into onpage efforts and off-page efforts. And when focusing on off-page efforts, a common SEO mistake marketers make is believing that their site will receive more SEO traffic if only they can find enough websites to build links on. Google is looking for authoritative sites that are actual businesses that are getting legitimate visitors to their site. Your users need the structure to navigate through your site, to click from one page to the other. And Google uses the structure of your site in order to determine what content is important and what content is less important.

Dynamic vs Static- Which is preferred?

Most people get SEO wrong, because they focus on what they think search engines want instead of focusing on the user. Besides looking for established companies and Internet presences to learn from, you can also pick up some good tips and quick information from up and coming companies that are suddenly doing well in the rankings. An early part of the SEO brainstorming process is identifying the great places to get links, as well as the types of content you might want to develop to encourage linking from other quality websites. Search engines don’t like familiar or generic content.

SEO has truly come into its own as a marketing channel

It’s not that keyword text doesn’t matter, but starting with a focused content strategy will help you identify audiences and topics that should guide your keyword selection. It may not be a good idea to link to the website from footers or sidebars. Another tip is to make sure you do your research and examine which terms to target before you set out. We asked an SEO Specialist, Gaz Hall, for his thoughts on the matter: "Keywords are still a factor in content, but with the Hummingbird update in 2013, the way they are used, viewed, and searched has changed dramatically."

Snappy results and SEO

Always remember to find natural local keywords. Simply stuffing in unnecessary mentions of the residing town may actually do your SEO more harm than good. Getting high-quality links from outside websites is key — especially if you can find a way to get .edu links. Google sees inbound links coming from websites ending in .edu as especially trustworthy. Community hijacking involves finding online communities that are made up of your target market, or people that can reach your target market so that you can build a relationship with them and get them to promote your content/brand/product(s). You might think that it is pointless to start learning SEO tips and tricks as the algorithms of search engines keep changing. That may be true to some extent but you’ll also notice that the points we will talk about below, have been there from the start and still play a vital role.