There are many theories, some backed by data, that show Google uses user metrics such as bounce rate, click through rate, time on site, etc. when determining the relevancy of a piece of content to the searcher’s query. Google’s featured snippet is a tool through which Google interacts with searchers. The more inputs Google receives from searchers, the better becomes its understanding of what they want. You should see improvements in website traffic, a key indicator of progress for your keywords. When you delete one or more posts or pages from your site, there’s often collateral damage.

When are you supposed to do it?

If you’re not able to rank on the first page, try to write another article, focused on a (even) more long tail keyword. Make it a little bit more specific, more niche. And see how that goes. Increase visibility to your optimized content by sharing it on social networks and building links to your content. Be sure to create internal and build external links from outside sites. SEO is important for every website that wants to attract traffic. SEO for non-profits, in that regard, isn’t that different from SEO for other businesses. Keep your sentences and paragraphs short, and break them up with line breaks (white space makes much for a much nicer reading experience on mobile) and subheadings

Linking to taxonomies

Local sponsorships can be another course of action for building local links. You can sponsor or donate to any local club/organization or society. Also, you can choose to sponsor a meetup group. It’s hard to imagine that just 10 years ago, SEO was a discipline governed by blackhat marketers whose sole objective was to increase rankings and drive traffic. Long story short—it wasn’t pretty, and Google didn’t like it. If you have covered the technical issues of a new website, you’ll have properly prepared your site for all the great content you’ll be adding. The Internet is made up of trillions of pages that are all connected to one another with links. These links are how search engines “crawl” the web, using virtual spiders (or bots). As these spiders follow the links on pages to other pages, they store information as they go. And they don’t miss a beat! From search terms to images and videos, these bots survey, collect and take note of any information they can get their spindly little hands on.

How are you supposed to audit your content?

One of the biggest lessons I’ve learned is that keywords can really keep web pages focused, which is important in SEO. We look at buyer persona behavior, industry trends, competitors and more to build a list of targeted terms, and then we focus on one term per page. In doing so, we can more easily provide value to our viewers. Google can detect well-written content, and can detect poor quality content, or unoriginal text. Provide high quality photographs of products, and include an easy to use magnification system so customers can get a good idea of the details. Be sure that colors are accurate and that no parts are obscured by reflections. Try photographing the items from several angles and either choose the most attractive result or allow customers to view each version in turn. According to SEO Consultant, Gaz Hall: "Although word count doesn’t rule the SEO world – nobody will read your stuff if it’s not helpful to them."

Mobile readiness is a confirmed general ranking factor.

For sites “with just a few things to mark up,” Google also offers a tool within Search Console that allows a site owner to quickly click-and-drag to apply structured data. If your web developer tells you that the website is accessible from a mobile device, don’t just trust him/her. Go over your mobile website yourself and check if you, as a visitor, can do all you want and need to do there. One of the most common problems for webmasters who run both mobile and desktop versions of a site is that the mobile version of the site appears for users on a desktop computer, or that the desktop version of the site appears when someone accesses it on a mobile device. Search engines (and users) look to the site architecture for clues as to what pages are most important. A key factor is how many clicks from the home page it takes to reach a page